Lulu's Vintage

Georgian & Victorian Hair Jewelry

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Fashioning jewelry out of human hair began back in the 1700's.
    Hair jewelry reached it's peak of popularity in the 1800's during the Victorian era.
    To make hair jewelry people would use locks of their own hair or a loved ones hair to braid and weave.
    These sentimental pieces of jewelry were made as remembrance and mourning jewelry as well as a token of affection for a loved one.

This mourning brooch is from the 19th century.
It features braided hair under beveled glass surrounded by pearls and set in 14k gold.
You can purchase this brooch over at Granite Pail Collectibles on GoAntiques.com for $150-

This brooch is from the Georgian era.
It features a braid of light and dark hair surrounded by pearls.
You can purchase this brooch over at Chancery Lane Antiques on GoAntiques.com for $360-

This brooch is from the late 1800's.
It features an R and sheaths of wheat on a mother of pearl background surrounded by woven hair on the exterior of the brooch.
You can purchase this brooch over at Lochiano Fine Antiques on GoAntiques.com for $195-

This bracelet is from the Georgian era.
It features a miniature portrait of a lady on a bracelet of woven hair.
You can purchase this bracelet over at the aptly named Dead Peoples Things on GoAntiques.com for $275-

This bracelet is engraved with the date of Oct. 1845.
It features a large oval cut citrine stone set into gold fittings on a intricately woven hair bracelet.
You can purchase this bracelet over at Antiques by Bubbleking on eBay for $350-

    Other interesting Hair links:
    *On the website Victorian Hair Jewelry.com modern day hair artist Sandra Johnson fashions your hair or your loved ones hair into intricately designed pendants.
    *Leila's Hair Museum is located in Independence, Missouri. The museum contains 159 wreaths and over 2,000 pieces of jewelry containing hair.
    When my husband and I took a road trip out to see his family in St.Louis two years ago I tried to convince him that we should stop by the Hair Museum- but, he was too weirded out by the idea. Maybe I can rope him into it this summer when we take a road trip across the U.S. and up to Montreal for my brother's wedding.
    For those of you who are into wacky architecture and roadside attractions you have to check out

This post was originally published on February 6, 2007.